Bookmarks for May 29th from 05:17 to 12:45

These are my links for May 29th from 05:17 to 12:45:

Bookmarks for May 20th from 19:50 to 22:03

These are my links for May 20th from 19:50 to 22:03:

Bookmarks for March 4th through March 6th

These are my links for March 4th through March 6th:

  • Welcome to VIPERdb – Scripps – VIPERdb is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures . The emphasis of the resource is on providing data from structural and computational analyses on these systems, as well as high quality renderings for visual exploration.
  • Virus images at VIPERdb – If you have ever wanted to make beautiful images of viruses, in colors of your choice, then go to VIPERdb, the virus particle explorer.
  • Reverse HTTP – IETF draft-lentczner-rhttp-00.txt – Formal description of the reverse HTTP proposal for initiating connections through firewalls then reversing server and client roles.
  • Reverse HTTP – Second Life Wiki – Experimental protocol which takes advantage of the HTTP/1.1 Upgrade: header to turn one HTTP socket around. When a client makes a request to a server with the Upgrade: PTTH/0.9 header, the server may respond with an Upgrade: PTTH/1.0 header, after which point the server starts using the socket as a client, and the client starts using the socket as a server.
  • WTFs/m – The only valid measurement of code quality, WTFs/min

Bookmarks for February 25th through February 26th

These are my links for February 25th through February 26th:

An open source Internet Imaging Protocol implementation

Data Compression Blog notes an updated release of the open source IIPImage Server.

There are some fun demos of interactive browsing through very high resolution satellite and Hubble telescope imagery of Earth, the Orion Nebula, and M101.

I haven’t kept up with IIP since wrapping up work on it many years ago (back at HP), so it’s interesting to see it still has a bit of life. The original implementation was done around 1996, before XML-RPC, SOAP, REST, and all of today’s Web 2.0 underpinnings. It’s amazing to look back and see how much internet software infrastructure has become widely deployed in the past ten years. I suspect we’d consider an implementation approach similar to Google or Yahoo Maps if the effort were started today, but I’m glad to see people find IIP useful.