Bookmarks for February 4th through February 11th

These are my links for February 4th through February 11th:

  • Schneier on Security: Interview with a Nigerian Internet Scammer – "We had something called the recovery approach. A few months after the original scam, we would approach the victim again, this time pretending to be from the FBI, or the Nigerian Authorities. The email would tell the victim that we had caught a scammer and had found all of the details of the original scam, and that the money could be recovered. Of course there would be fees involved as well. Victims would often pay up again to try and get their money back."
  • xkcd – Frequency of Strip Versions of Various Games – n = Google hits for "strip <game name>" / Google hits for "<game name>"
  • PeteSearch: How to split up the US – Visualization of social network clusters in the US. "information by location, with connections drawn between places that share friends. For example, a lot of people in LA have friends in San Francisco, so there's a line between them.

    Looking at the network of US cities, it's been remarkable to see how groups of them form clusters, with strong connections locally but few contacts outside the cluster. For example Columbus, OH and Charleston WV are nearby as the crow flies, but share few connections, with Columbus clearly part of the North, and Charleston tied to the South."

  • Redis: Lightweight key/value Store That Goes the Extra Mile | Linux Magazine – Sort of like memcache. "Calling redis a key/value store doesn’t quite due it justice. It’s better thought of as a “data structures” server that supports several native data types and operations on them. That’s pretty much how creator Salvatore Sanfilippo (known as antirez) describes it in the documentation. Let’s dig in and see how it works."
  • Op-Ed Contributor – Microsoft’s Creative Destruction – NYTimes.com – Unlike other companies, Microsoft never developed a true system for innovation. Some of my former colleagues argue that it actually developed a system to thwart innovation. Despite having one of the largest and best corporate laboratories in the world, and the luxury of not one but three chief technology officers, the company routinely manages to frustrate the efforts of its visionary thinkers.

Bookmarks for May 5th through May 6th

These are my links for May 5th through May 6th:

Bookmarks for April 30th through May 2nd

These are my links for April 30th through May 2nd:

  • FusionCharts Free – Animated Flash Charts and Graphs for ASP, PHP, ASP.NET, JSP, RoR and other web applications – Flash charting component that can be used to render data-driven & animated charts for your web applications and presentations. It is a cross-browser and cross-platform solution that can be used with PHP, Python, Ruby on Rails, ASP, ASP.NET, JSP, ColdFusion, simple HTML pages or even PowerPoint Presentations to deliver interactive and powerful flash charts. You do NOT need to know anything about Flash to use FusionCharts. All you need to know is the language you're programming in.
  • Raphaël—JavaScript Library – Raphaël is a small JavaScript library that should simplify your work with vector graphics on the web. If you want to create your own specific chart or image crop and rotate widget, for example, you can achieve it simply and easily with this library. Raphaël uses the SVG W3C Recommendation and VML as a base for creating graphics. This means every graphical object you create is also a DOM object, so you can attach JavaScript event handlers or modify them later. Raphaël’s goal is to provide an adapter that will make drawing vector art compatible cross-browser and easy.
  • A Really Gentle Introduction to Data Mining | Regular Geek – List of data mining blogs and related resources.
  • BlackBerry SSH Tutorial: Connect to Unix Server using MidpSSH for Mobile Devices – Notes on using MidpSSH on Blackberry for remote access to servers. Seems to work, although big network lag on my BlackBerry Bold / AT&T.
  • Country Reports on Terrorism 2008 – U.S. law requires the Secretary of State to provide Congress, by April 30 of each year, a full and complete report on terrorism with regard to those countries and groups meeting criteria set forth in the legislation. This annual report is entitled Country Reports on Terrorism. Beginning with the report for 2004, it replaced the previously published Patterns of Global Terrorism.
  • DIY: How To Find Authoritative Twitter Users Plus 100 To Get You Started | Ignite Social Media – Some comments on recommendation metrics for Twitter, trying to use "favorites" mark as an indicator.
  • SIGUSR2 > The Power That is GNU Emacs – "If you've never been convinced before that Emacs is the text editor in which dreams are made from, or that inside Emacs there are unicorns manipulating your text, don't expect me to convince you."

Bookmarks for April 20th through April 23rd

These are my links for April 20th through April 23rd:

Bookmarks for April 18th through April 19th

These are my links for April 18th through April 19th:

Bookmarks for April 15th through April 17th

These are my links for April 15th through April 17th:

Bookmarks for April 13th through April 15th

These are my links for April 13th through April 15th:

Bookmarks for April 12th through April 13th

These are my links for April 12th through April 13th:

Bookmarks for April 12th from 17:02 to 19:13

These are my links for April 12th from 17:02 to 19:13:

Bookmarks for April 7th through April 9th

These are my links for April 7th through April 9th:

Bookmarks for February 26th from 10:39 to 20:05

These are my links for February 26th from 10:39 to 20:05:

Bookmarks for February 25th through February 26th

These are my links for February 25th through February 26th:

Bookmarks for February 24th through February 25th

These are my links for February 24th through February 25th:

Bookmarks for February 15th through February 16th

These are my links for February 15th through February 16th:

AOL Research publishes 20 million search queries

More raw data for search engineers and SEOs, and fodder for online privacy debates – AOL Research has released a collection of roughly 20 million search queries which include all searches done by a randomly selected set of around 500,000 users from March through May 2006.

This should be a great data set to work with if you’re doing research on search engines, but seems problematic from a privacy perspective. The data is anonymized, so AOL user names are replaced with a numerical user ID:

The data set includes {UserID, Query, QueryTime, ClickedRank, DestinationDomainUrl}.

I suspect it may be possible to reverse engineer some of the query clusters to identify specific users or other personal data. If nothing else, I occasionally observe people accidentally typing in user names or passwords into search boxes, so there are likely to be some of those in the mix. “Anonymous” in the comments over at Greg Linden’s blog thinks there will be a lot of those. The destination URLs have apparently been clipped as well, so you won’t be able to see the exact page that resulted in a click-through.

Haven’t taken a look at the actual data yet, but I’m glad I’m not an AOL user.

Adam D’Angelo says:

This is the same data that the DOJ wanted from Google back in March. This ruling allowed Google to keep all query logs secret. Now any government can just go download the data from AOL.

On the search application side, this is a rare look at actual user search behavior, which would be difficult to obtain without access to a high traffic search engine or possibly through a paid service.

Plentyoffish sees an opportunity for PPC and Adsense spammers:

Google/ AOL have just given some of the worlds biggest spammers a breakdown of high traffic terms its just a matter of weeks now until google gets mega spammed with made for adsense sites and other kind of spam sites targetting keywords contained in this list.

I think it’s great that AOL is trying to open up more and engage with the research community, and it looks like there are some other interesting data collections on the AOL Research site — but I suspect they’re about to take a lot of heat on the privacy front, judging from the mix of initial reactions on Techmeme. Hope it doesn’t scare them away and they find a way to publish useful research data without causing a privacy disaster.

More on the privacy angle from SiliconBeat, Zoli Erdos

See also: Coming soon to DVD – 1,146,580,664 common five-word sequences

Update – Sunday 08-06-2006 20:31 PDT – AOL Research appears to have taken down the announcement and the log data in the past few hours in response to a growing number of blog posts, mostly critical, and mostly focused on privacy. Markus at Plentyoffish has also used the data to generate a list of ringtone search keywords which users clicked through to a ringtone site as an example of how this data can be used by SEO and spam marketers. Looks like the privacy issues are going to get the most airtime right now, but I think the keyword clickthrough data is going to have the most immediate effect.

Update Monday 08-07-2006 08:02 PDT: Some mirrors of the AOL data